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The WD-35/WD-45

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Calvin Schmidt View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Calvin Schmidt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Nov 2022 at 8:35am
A few years ago I went with my son in law to an Amish man the sold a lot of new Cummins engines. SIL was re-powering a stump grinder with a 8.3L. We were told that he only stocked the basic engine and they made it what ever Horsepower that you wanted. Parts were the same. If you paid more for higher HP from Cummins, you were only pre-paying for potential warranty. Makes sense 
Nothing is impossible if it is properly financed
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Calvin Schmidt View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Calvin Schmidt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Nov 2022 at 8:39am
On a side note, I talked to a guy who when to the same Amish guy for a 8.3 for his 8070. He was told that he happened to have a couple of Sisu engines and that they would fit better.  The very happy AC owner now has a Sisu powered 8070 and 7060. 
Nothing is impossible if it is properly financed
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bigal121892 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Nov 2022 at 11:45am
What is the name of Norm Swinford's, "Bible"?
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Ed (Ont) View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ed (Ont) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Nov 2022 at 3:09pm
Allis Chalmers Farm Equipment 1914-1985.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bigal121892 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Nov 2022 at 5:29pm
Thank you.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote IBWD MIke Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Nov 2022 at 5:57pm
Originally posted by bigal121892 bigal121892 wrote:

What is the name of Norm Swinford's, "Bible"?
Ed got you the right answer. My copy sits here next to the computer. When someone asks a question I'm not sure about, I consult the 'Bible'!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote LionelinKY Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Nov 2022 at 4:37am
Originally posted by DrAllis DrAllis wrote:

I don't really have an issue with the outboard final drives and a 28 inch tire per say. Take a 16.9 x 28 tire for example. It has more square inches of "foot print" on the ground than a 13.6 x 38 inch tire. So we're talking like a D-17 versus a 2510 John Deere or 400 Farmall. How about an 18.4 x 28 versus a 16.9 x 34 ??  A One-Eighty versus a 1650 Oliver for comparison. The 18.4 x 28 again has MORE rubber on the ground. The D-19 size chassis was a good place to redesign the finals for a larger diameter tire. Just too late in history and lacking in features others had.

Hey, Doc. How about the foot print of a 16.9x28 vs a 15.5x38 if you happen to know??? Reason I ask is that was 1 reason given to me years ago about why a WD45 would never compete with/outwork an Oliver 770. This was even after I had explained the power, weight, and tire increase that our WD45 has vs what a stock WD45 was. We had both on the farm and Dad always said the WD45 had NO problem doing anything that the 770 could and most things even better in his opinion. It wasn't until after he had passed, that I was chatting with a couple of my Uncles(Mom's brothers) that had helped on the farm when they were teenagers and they admitted to once hooking the 2 together at the drawbar only to dig some huge holes in the ground without either gaining an inch.
"My name is Lionel and I'm an Allisoholic"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DrAllis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Nov 2022 at 5:48am
As from the Firestone Tire foot print chart: 16.9 x 28 has a 175 square inch contact area. A 13.6 x 38 has 165 square inch contact area. A 15.5 x 38 has 180 square inches of contact area. The winner of this contest is the 14.9 x 38 (which there aren't as many of, it seems) has 200 square inches !!!!  So, the 15.5 x 38 has a negligible advantage over a 16.9 x 28.      I had mentioned before the 18.4 x 28 tire was 250 square inches versus a 16.9 x 34 which was only 220 square inches. Some of us cuss the 180/185 tire size, when in reality it was better than a 16.9 x 34 !! Didn't see that one coming, did ya !!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote allischalmerguy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Nov 2022 at 7:40pm
Originally posted by DrAllis DrAllis wrote:

Interesting read, Dave. My WD-35 engine versus the WD-45 engine wouldn't really be an issue, I don't think. Every single part between them is exactly the same, except for the pistons and the crankshaft. The production cost differences of the pistons and crankshafts would be in pennies, just a matter of which ones they used. The carburetor was a bolt on vendored part, so just choose which one is needed. I'd imagine they'd have to make a batch of each engine, maybe a weeks run of one or the other to keep crankshafts and pistons in the proper sequence. Repair parts books would include each type of part used. Anyway, we will never know !!!


Dr. A. I wish they had done it! I agree they already had the production and tooling to make the WD35. No added costs there. I wish they had a platform on the tractors though. That is my only grip about the WD and WD45. It is harder to stand up and drive, I guess you can stand behind the seat.

Dave that was a neat story on the Dodge D50 pickup. I never dreamed a dealer would do that!

It is great being a disciple of Jesus! 1950 WD, 1957 D17...retired in Iowa,
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DaveKamp Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Nov 2022 at 9:01pm
Originally posted by darrel in ND darrel in ND wrote:

Great thread! So many things that could have/should have been done differently by allis. But in the grand scheme of things, a different CEO in the end would have been the one thing that would have saved the company.


Always keep in mind... Allis Chalmers was NOT a "Farm Equipment Company"... it was a foundry/manufacturing technology company whose primary market was electrical generation and transmission equipment.  If they weren't building end bells, stator shafts, turbines and control gates for hydroelectric dams, they were making roller and tainter gates for our nation's rivers (the Upper Mississippi 9-foot channel act was HUGE) steam turbines for generating stations, steam engines to run all sorts of mills, factories, and municipal pumping stations.  They rolled silicon steel sheet to make laminated cores for their huge substation transmission transformers and small pole-top distribution transformers.

Farm tractors was just what they made of all the leftover iron and steel resulting from their BIG projects.   For every AC tractor ever made, there were THOUSANDS of pole-top transformers made.

It wasn't the agricultural tractor business, nor the heavy equipment business, that had any impact on the company's decent, it was the change in the business which brought their greatest scale of economics:  electrical power.  They experienced a boom while our country grew from being unelectrified, to extensively electrified.... and once that electrification started to taper off, their business did, too.
Ten Amendments, Ten Commandments, and one Golden Rule solve most every problem. Citrus hand-cleaner with Pumice does the rest.
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