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Removing broken manifold stud

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DSeries4 View Drop Down
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Joined: 12 Sep 2009
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DSeries4 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Removing broken manifold stud
    Posted: 19 Jan 2020 at 6:30pm
I had a manifold stud break off almost flush with the head on my neighbor's D15 gas.  All the others loosened up nicely.  What is the best way to get the remainder out of the head?  I really do not want to remove the head.

Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance!
'49 G, '54 WD45, '57 WD45, '58 D14, '59 D14, '61 D15D, '66 D15II, '66 D21II, '67 D17IV, '67 D17IVD, '67 190XTD, '73 620, '76 185, '77 175, '85 6080
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DrAllis View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DrAllis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2020 at 6:48pm
The best way??  Usually wire brush it off clean so there's no rust, weld a flat washer to it (and let it cool off) and if you can't get it with a vise grips, weld a nut on top of the flat washer. When I say flat washer, I mean one that has a hole that just fits the broken off stud and thick enough to get ahold of with the wise grips. Striking the stud with a proper sized punch a direct blow before welding on it helps too.

Edited by DrAllis - 19 Jan 2020 at 6:49pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boss Man Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2020 at 7:01pm
I usually center punch and drill the stud before doing as DrAllis said. Gives it more room to shrink as it cools. Only needs to be a 1/8-3/16 hole

Edited by Boss Man - 19 Jan 2020 at 7:32pm
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tomNE View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tomNE Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2020 at 7:05pm
doc allis gave u the best advice know to man!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ACinSC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jan 2020 at 6:55am
Dunno why but my gas D 15 only had 3 studs in the head . Other 5 were bolts . I managed to get the studs out without breaking them but it had me worried . Good luck !
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lowell66dart Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jan 2020 at 7:23am
As mentionedthe welding a nut on usually works. If it doesn't and you have access to a torch rig and are good with it here's another way. Slowly heat the broken stud till it's cherry red and them wash it out. I watched  guy at a engine rebuilder shop do this many times. Works slick.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DrAllis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jan 2020 at 7:44am
A flat washer usually works better on the 3/8" bolts and smaller. Welding thru a small nut makes it hard to always get a good bead stuck to the broken off stud. Once the flat washer is stuck good, you can then weld a larger diameter (and easier to weld) nut to the flat washer. Letting things cool down allows the weld to shrink the broken off stud.  Torching in this case bothers me because some of the studs are close to the head gasket surface.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bob-Maine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jan 2020 at 8:05am
I have had good luck using a reverse twist drill bit just smaller than the stud diameter. The combination of the heat generated buy the drilling and the torque working to back out the stud has worked for me. Bob@allisdowneast
I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not sure.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Steve Bright Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jan 2020 at 10:14am
What Bob-Maine said works for me also.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dave (Mid-MI) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jan 2020 at 5:52pm
I have never had luck using a left-hand drill bit on a stud or bolt that was stuck so tight that it broke. I have removed lots of broken bolts by welding nuts to them. Use a nut one size larger than the stud, hold the nut tight against the head, and weld enough to get the nut red hot, which puts enough heat into the stud. As soon as the nut cools enough to not evaporate penetrating oil, apply some to the nut. Keep applying as the nut cools. As the metal cools, it pulls the oil into the threads. I use Kroil, after trying many brands. Let the nut cool nearly to room temp, then start working it back and forth.

Edited by Dave (Mid-MI) - 20 Jan 2020 at 5:53pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SteveM C/IL Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jan 2020 at 8:48pm
I just build the end of stud up with weld till I get enough to grab with a Vise Grip. Takes several bursts but has always worked. A wire welder would be nice for the washer method but my stick  sl*g makes that difficult. When you don't weld all the time,the skills suffer.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SteveM C/IL Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jan 2020 at 8:49pm
Is sl*g a bad word? LOL! It must be.

Edited by SteveM C/IL - 20 Jan 2020 at 8:49pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DiyDave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jan 2020 at 8:59pm
Is the stud in question, the wet one (front, IIRR)?  If so, be prepared, drain the antifreeze...Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DrAllis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jan 2020 at 8:01am
Using a flat washer with a hole the same size or a little smaller than the broken stud, helps keep the weld where it belongs and not out into the cylinder head area, which can only makes things worse.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ac fleet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jan 2020 at 11:07am
The only thing I ever found was to center punch and start drilling then re-thread.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote plummerscarin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jan 2020 at 12:42pm
I used Doc's method on an M3. Worked great
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JimD Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jan 2020 at 10:06am
Doesn't help you now, but may help another later.  When folks call and order our stud kits I tell them to start soaking with good oil ASAP.  I like deep creep/sea foam. Others here like kroil.  Both are excellent.  most oils sold are NOT worth bothering with.  I like to soak a few days if I can.  Giving a quick tap once a day right on the end to help.
Then when I do break them, I do exactly as Dr Allis said.  Rarely will it break again. Even right at the head I can still weld them loose.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jaybmiller Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jan 2020 at 10:27am
When I replaced several studs on D-14 #2, I used TWO flat washers under the nut. My theory was the stud might not break off at the head next time, less rotational stress on the stud, and OK, too lazy to put the extra back into the box of washers.
So far it's working......
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dusty MI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jan 2020 at 12:04pm
My theory why this works.
 When you weld on the broken stud the heat causes it to expand in all directions, but it can't expand side ways, and only goes length ways. Then when it cools it shrinks from all directions, therefor it pulls away from the sides that rust has caused it to stick to.

Dusty
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DougG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jan 2020 at 12:58pm
Your right Dusty,heat is great as the bolt material is different from the cast,   I have put a torch on the bolt, just to get cherry red, cool it and it comes out so easy, and have done the welding too
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tomNE Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jan 2020 at 7:40pm
I been welding broken off bolts out of cast for 40+ yrs and its never failed to work

7000 series door shock kits!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DiyDave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jan 2020 at 8:28pm
Since I got this, I've rarely had to drag torches around...Wink




Edited by DiyDave - 23 Jan 2020 at 8:31pm
Source: Babylon Bee
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DaveKamp Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jan 2020 at 9:35pm
Yeah, but  can you get it around a stud that's broken off flush inside a casting???

I weld a washer, then a nut, or if it's larger, a  nut to the stud, and back it out with vise-grips...


Edited by DaveKamp - 23 Jan 2020 at 9:36pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DiyDave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jan 2020 at 4:59am
Originally posted by DaveKamp DaveKamp wrote:

Yeah, but  can you get it around a stud that's broken off flush inside a casting???

I weld a washer, then a nut, or if it's larger, a  nut to the stud, and back it out with vise-grips...

Dave, after years of doing it the hard way, I have learned to use every advantage I can, to get them out whole, and not break them!  Particularly that front manifold bolt!  If that fails, then I do resort to the mig welder!Wink
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