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SAE 80 EP ?

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David G. View Drop Down
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    Posted: 23 Jul 2012 at 5:17pm
I recently added a D19 diesel to the stable . I am going to change all of the fluids. The operators manual calls for SAE 80 EP for the transmission and final drive. Is this the same as 80w-90 gear oil? I know oil specs have changed since the early 60's and was thinking its the same but thought I would ask to be sure. Thanks in advance.
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Joe(TX) View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Joe(TX) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jul 2012 at 8:27pm
It will work fine
1970 190XT, 1973 200, 1962 D-19 Diesel, 1979 7010, 1957 WD45, 1950 WD, 1961 D17, Speed Patrol, D14, All crop 66 big bin, 180 diesel, 1970 170 diesel, FP80 forklift. Gleaner A
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David G. View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote David G. Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jul 2012 at 8:28pm
anybody?
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D-17_Dave View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote D-17_Dave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jul 2012 at 8:32pm
EP stood for Extra Pressure, hence to make sure there was still a film of oil between the gear teeth from the torque. Due to the oil chemistry we have today there are additives that eliminate this designation. Todays 80/90 weight is the replacement.
Yea, I can fix that.....
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David G. View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote David G. Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jul 2012 at 8:47pm
I would have used the 80/90 and never thought anything else about it, but today when I was at the Rural King there was a SAE 90 EP oil that said hyd/trans and said ford in parenthesis. I thought it was worth asking about . Thanks for the help.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BigPuma Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Sep 2017 at 7:12pm
Just got my hands onto my fathers D17. It rarely gets used, and will basically be a "tinker toy" for me to fix up, and rejuvenate... Getting ready to drain and replace fluids. Opinions on synthetic fluids instead of conventional? It will probably get less than a few hundred hours a year unless I roger up for the elder farmers around here. And even then it won't be many hours.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MACK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Sep 2017 at 9:17pm
Put hydraulic wet brake -821-universal hydraulic. Don't use that heavy stuff that don't get in bearings in cold weather.   MACK
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JJ_ncOhio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Sep 2017 at 9:33pm
I just did this when servicing planetary finals on the rwa axle on my combine. Manufacture wanted 90ep, can't find that product anywhere. Google search says Castrol makes it; appears to be readily available in Europe, not in continental US. Ok, so what to use as a substitute? I used Scheiffer's 75w90 synthetic. I recommend you use a synthetic also.

Here's the deal, 80w90 has additives. Those additives are designated on your container as API rating (GL5, GL4,....ect) API GL5 meets military spec. Each rating refers to the additives in that particular oil. Problem with additives some are corrosive, caustic, to yellow metals (brass, bronze, ect....) I can't say because I haven't had a D19 rear end apart, nor have I broken into the finals on my rear wheel assist, so I can't say that there are yellow metal shims or whatever inside the gear case. Nor do I want to find out with the expense of replacing. Part of the "engineering" in synthetic oils is uniform molecule size, as well chemical make up not needing additives.

Like I was saying I went with a synthetic and feel safe with it. I saw this thread and thought I might chime in, certainly not an expert, just recently went through the same process as you.

Hope this helps
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DougS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2017 at 6:17am
I'd go with 75W-90 synthetic also. It will work better than the old stuff and it flows better in the extreme cold.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tractorhead9542 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2017 at 8:38am
You may run in to a leak horse. Synthetic oils will come in and clean out sludge and seals and 'relax' them. Unless overhauled with new seals, I do not recommend it. I have been in heavy equipment for 20 years and have seen this happen several times- automotive and off road
The road to nowhere...leads to me
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BigPuma Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2017 at 9:12am
Yes I also work heavy equipment for a municipality. The service schedule is pretty strict so we don't have too many leakers... The tractor has sat for a few years with only occasional starts. I plan on going through it this winter
Also, thoughts on Lucas additives? I've had good experiences with it in the past, but it's been in the automotive side and not agricultural equipment
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tractorhead9542 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2017 at 9:26am
Look I am a firm believer in synthetics. But I do not and will not run it in anything pre 1988 unless overhauled (automotive). They will leak! And I found it to be true that Engines & Transmissions designed to take straight weight oils do not like multi viscosity fluids and have found evidence with bearing failure due to oil break down and overheat.

I wish not to upset anyone but I have spent many years replying to the questions and comments label and or calling the phone numbers on the back of products to receive more information. I'm kind of a dork when it comes to fluid analysis. More expensive generally doesn't mean better in fact the oil that Tractor Supply sells is the same quality as high end brands.

Everybody has their own preference and 'doctored up 'mixture to feel good about, even myself. I have always felt if you need to add something to your oil to get it to run right, you are prolonging a problem. There are additives to help cool oil and add lubricity and that's great. But we all know that these machines have been in service way longer and have way more bearing wear than what a little bit is synthetic additive will help now!
The road to nowhere...leads to me
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DougS View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DougS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2017 at 11:18am
The problem of synthetics causing leaks was solved in the 1970s. Shade tree mechanics just keep passing folklore down from generation to generation. We're not talking engine sludge in a transmission. If I have sludge in my engine I'm going to run a high detergent cleaner first, with appropriate filter changes, anyway.

Edited by DougS - 04 Sep 2017 at 11:20am
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tractorhead9542 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tractorhead9542 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2017 at 11:20am
And then you will get leaks anyway DougS
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tractorhead9542 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tractorhead9542 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2017 at 11:23am
Who got you so accusatory and upset. Take it easy.
The road to nowhere...leads to me
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Dans 7080 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dans 7080 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2017 at 11:38am
Common leak problems with the synthetic oils is the use of permatex instead of a proper gasket. The synthetic oil will eat the blue goo and cause a leak.
When someone tells you Nothings Impossible, Tell them to slam a revolving door
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tractorhead9542 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tractorhead9542 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2017 at 11:43am
Very true and poor rubber parts (usually aftermarket) from overseas seem to be an issue.
The road to nowhere...leads to me
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Bill Long View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bill Long Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2017 at 12:13pm
Even in the 40's and 50's they had what we called detergent oil.  We found in machines that had not been recently overhauled that using detergent oil could cause leaking and oil burning.  It took the crud away that kept the oil from burning or leaks.  Got quite a few more hours on the engine till overhaul.
If you have a unit like Big Puma's D-17 that is just used for "tinkering around" and you have no plans for an overhaul then use the non detergent oil.  You will get more hours without problems.
In the hydraulic compartment use non detergent 20 wt oil.  Even though I have heard excellent reports on the use of the newer transhyd oils I have heard they can also cause problems with seals leaking in older units.  Older seals may not be used to the chemicals in the newer oils.  If you have recently overhauled the transmission or rear ends and replaced the seals use the newer oils by all means.  They really are better.  However,  
my thinking on the older non overhauled units is use the originally prescribed oils or thereabouts.
Good Luck!
Bill Long
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Brian Jasper co. Ia View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Brian Jasper co. Ia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2017 at 4:01pm
Any of the RTV sealers that smell like vinegar are bad choices for any sort of automotive use. Over time they will corrode metal and are not particularly suited for petroleum oil environments. A much better choice is Motorcraft TA31. GM also uses a very similar sealer.
"Any man who thinks he can be happy and prosperous by letting the government take care of him better take a closer look at the American Indian." Henry Ford
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