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Homemade Tractors

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R.W View Drop Down
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    Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 9:01am
Homemade TractorHomemade B&S Engine Tractorfiat tank.jpg
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Denis in MI View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Denis in MI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 9:08am
I like the first one
1938 B, 1945 B, 1941 IB, 1949 C, 2 1938 WCs, 3 1950 WDs, 1951 WD, 2 1955 WD45, 1957 D-14
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Burgie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 9:08am
"Burgie"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote R.W Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 9:16am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote R.W Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 9:17am
I DO NOT HAVE ANY RIGHTS TO THESE PHOTOS!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote R.W Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 9:36am
heres some more denis     Some pictures during the build of my Homemade 4X4 TractorHomemade 4X4 Articulated TractorSome pictures during the build of my Homemade 4X4 TractorSome pictures during the build of my Homemade 4X4 TractorSome pictures during the build of my Homemade 4X4 TractorHomemade tractorHomemade tractor


Edited by R.W - 02 Jan 2011 at 9:45am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gerald J. Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 10:06am
There was a company at Albert City, IA that sold tractors based on Model A or Chevy power plants. They supplied the rear end.

There were dozens of makers of conversion kits for model T cars into tractors.

My dad built a garden tractor from a new gas engine and lots of cut down and welded back together model A parts in about 1950. I have it. Pullls a one horse plow and originally had a side mounted rotary mower. I learned to drive on it at age 7.

I've seen similar home made tractors to my dad's at shows and I collect their pictures.

Gerald J.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ToddSin NY Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 10:15am
I really like the first one! That is cool!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GBACBFan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 10:41am
Todd, here's a link to some Youtube videos of the first one.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ToddSin NY Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 12:02pm
Thanks for the link Larry. I realy like the way he built it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Pat the Plumber CIL Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 12:27pm
Thanks for the pictures.I worked for an older farmer who built a small tractor from a design he took from a Mech.Illustated magazine.It used a truck rear end and tranny,motor was an older wisc.He mounted a 1 row JD planter on it and used it to fill in spots where large planter missed.Steering wheel was flat ,but I was suprised how well it worked for being homemade.
You only need to know 3 things to be a plumber;Crap rolls down hill,Hot is on the left and Don't bite your fingernails
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DonBC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 1:16pm
I have thought about building a small 4WD tractor using the engine and drive train of a small front wheel drive car by turning it 90 degrees and having the axle stubs drive front and rear differentials. This would give about a 3 to 1 reduction. It could articulate in the middle or if I used the axles from an old Suzuki 4x4 it could have either front or rear axle steering depending on whether or not it was going to be a loader tractor or a regular tractor. Maybe someday if I run out of projects.  
Jack of all trades, master of none
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote GBACBFan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 3:20pm
Take a look at the last pic in the first set, the B&W pic with the home built tractor with the sickle mower. It looks like he has an anvil laying on the mower to weight it down!
"The trouble with quotes on the Internet is that you can never know if they
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Larry in OK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 5:07pm
Some of those are absolute marvels of ingenuity and engineering and some of them look seriously dangerous. :)
Some people are like Slinkies. Not really good for much of anything but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bob(W-Md) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2011 at 6:32pm
The Model AA with air compressor is mine.The Model A Ford-XLT is my friends contrapsion. Dodge Bros. a local guy.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote R.W Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2011 at 7:05pm

Home-made tractor a beautyTwins with their sons and 30yr old home made tractor

September 10, 2008

A 30-YEAR-OLD, home-made tractor, like its 79-year-old owners, is still going strong in the Mallee, reports MARK SAUNDERS

George and Albert Oliver's home-made 30-year-old tractor is not only still running strong, it now has the latest GPS precision equipment.

The 224kW articulated tractor, built by twins George and Albert in 1977, can now be operated with two centimetre accuracy and driven hands-free.

The Olivers crop about 2840ha on their family property at Manangatang with their sons Peter and Kevin.

For the twins, who both still drive the tractor, the addition of GPS is simply another step towards more efficient farming.

Albert said they have been cropping on 300mm row spacings for four years and now they have GPS capabilities, the next change could be to controlled traffic farming.

"We got into the GPS because of the increased accuracy and reduced input costs," Albert said.

"We sowed all this year's crop using the GPS system and it's proved a winner. We can also spray with the GPS and we will be using it on the harvesters for the first time this year."

Peter added that another benefit was the reduction in stress on the driver.

"In the past we had used a foam marker, but that could blow away in the wind or be dissolved by the time you completed a lap of the paddock.

"With the GPS, we can spray at night or in the mornings which is great for summer weed control and the dust is no longer a problem," Peter said.

"The real benefit is what you save by avoiding overlap. In one paddock of 640 acres (260ha), we saved 20 acres (8ha).

"It's costing us about $80 an acre (0.40ha) so that really adds up. Just in that one paddock we were $1600 ahead."

And the twins are living proof that age is no barrier when it comes to technology.

Albert said the GPS was quite simple to use, once he had spent a little time getting familiar with the programming.

"Once you have it set up right, it is very easy and just a matter of following the processes. You just need to sit down and take your time and follow it through."

Jim Castles from GPS-Ag at Ouyen installed the GPS equipment that is an A5 Autofarm RTK 2cm system using base stations that are located at either end of the Oliver property. Jim said both stations are available to other farmers in the area using GPS-Ag gear.

"We're creating a network right across the Mallee," Jim said.

The twins' "can do" attitude has been a part of their farming for decades.

In the 1960s they built their own self-propelled harvester by joining two PTO-driven harvesters.

Generally, they prefer to innovate, where possible, rather than buy new equipment. Neither George nor Albert has formal qualifications in fabrication or engineering. It was no different with the articulated tractor.

Albert said they felt they could not justify the expense of buying a new tractor in the 1970s for the amount of land they were farming then, so they decided to build their own.

"We really only had a sketch to go on and we had seen an articulated tractor and thought that was the way to go.

"We are quite mechanically minded and we thought it should not be too hard a task."

Twelve months later, Albert and George had built the tractor, complete with a GM 71 Series diesel that, in its day, was standard in Kenworth trucks and the differentials are from a Sherman tank.

The front and rear differentials weigh close to five tonnes each and have 75mm thick steel casings.

It has never been weighed, but the twins reckon the tractor would tip the scales somewhere between 15 and 20 tonnes.

"There are no issues with ballast, that's for sure," Albert said.

He added there have never been any major breakdowns with the tractor, known simply as "AGO" that stands for Albert and George Oliver. The twins built everything on the tractor, except for the cabin, which was pre-fabricated in Ballarat.

In more than 30 years, the tractor has racked up about 14,000 engine hours and is still on its original tyres, although Albert conceded he ordered a new set just the other week.

The tractor sowed about half of the Olivers' crop this year and is used in cultivation work.

Albert said it was also one of the first tractors to have closed centre hydraulics, that enables most of the hydraulic functions such as steering and implement control to be run from the one pump.

Gearing is courtesy of a 13-speed Roadranger gearbox.

Albert laughed when he recalled the day they attempted to find the tractor's top speed.

"We had it up to about 80km/h and the car was struggling to keep up. We weren't game to go any faster."

He also remembered when the tractor was to first be registered.

"We had to provide a chassis number and as we built it, we just put the date on it - 12071977."

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Unique: George and Albert Oliver and the tractor they built in 1977.

Unique: George and Albert Oliver and the tractor they built in 1977.

Tough: the differential comes from a Sherman tank.

Tough: the differential comes from a Sherman tank.

Mod cons: Albert Oliver in the cabin with the GPS and automatic steering.

Mod cons: Albert Oliver in the cabin with the GPS and automatic steering.




Edited by R.W - 03 Jan 2011 at 7:15pm
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R.W View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote R.W Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2011 at 7:13pm
ImageShack, share photos, pictures, free image hosting, free video hosting, image hosting, video hosting, photo image hosting site, video hosting sitejonbug061.jpg - 78450 Bytes
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cbuttre835 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2011 at 8:47pm
When I hit the mega millions tonight I'm going to quit my job and start building one to out do the Big Bud 16V-747.  
(all Dad's stuff)

C w/ 3rd gear out

D15 II factory 3 point

WD (no motor!)(parts for sale!)

WD 45 wide front
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kbeitz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 7:54pm
One of many tractors I made....uploads/5549/One_of_the_best640-480.jpg
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jhid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 7:57pm
my grampy had one for his garden he made out of a Model A that he used for years until he bought a cub
red and green are nice for christmas, but orange is all year round
http://www.canadianantiquetractor.com/tractorforum/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kbeitz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 7:57pm
Let me try the picture thing again...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CTuckerNWIL Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 8:19pm
Originally posted by DonBC DonBC wrote:

I have thought about building a small 4WD tractor using the engine and drive train of a small front wheel drive car by turning it 90 degrees and having the axle stubs drive front and rear differentials. This would give about a 3 to 1 reduction. It could articulate in the middle or if I used the axles from an old Suzuki 4x4 it could have either front or rear axle steering depending on whether or not it was going to be a loader tractor or a regular tractor. Maybe someday if I run out of projects.  

About 20 years ago, my brother Bill and I sat down and sketch up one like you describe using the Dodge Omni 2.2 and a 5sp tranny. Running through S10 or Ranger differentials I figured about 45MPH tops in OD and 1st would go about 5 if you wound it up far enough. With articulated steering and a horizontal pivot in the center joint, it could go a lot of places. I was thinking on the lines of a wood cutting vehicle to get in the timber and haul wood out. A guy would have to limit the slip in the original differential so you had power to both axles all the time.
http://www.ae-ta.com
Lena 1935 WC12xxx,1938 B2xx, 1950 WD, Willie 1951 CA6xx Dad bought new, 1954WD45 PS, 1960 D17 NF
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gatz in NE Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 10:48pm
Really interesting designs of home-built tractors.  Enjoyed watching the vids of that first one.
This is a tractor I built over 20 years ago.  It's main purpose was to blade snow out of our seemingly long driveway. 
The differentials are OMC units that you'd see on a Cushman Truckster.
The engine is an OMC 2-cylinder gas which I overhauled before starting the project.
The hydro is a Sundstrand unit driven off the engine crank and the output is a #60 roller-chain to the input of the rear differential.  A short telescoping driveshaft then goes to the front differential. 
The steering is a drag-link type powersteering unit from a 69 Mustang.  There's a joystick that controls the power steering (L & R)  and there's a push-pull cable that controls the speed/direction via the hydro.  The throttle is borrowed from a motorcycle and is the handle on the joystick.  I had to place a solenoid-actuated reverse lockout on the side of the hydro to prevent the tractor from "hopping".  The solenoid was controlled by a small button on the top of the joystick....so if you slowed down suddenly, the hydro wouldn't go into reverse unless the button was pressed.
The center articulation was patterned after a large Ford 4-wheel tractor using a 3-pt balljoint on the top and 2 adjustible tierods (from the Mustang) providing the swivel or articulation.  The blade was raised/lowered with a single-acting cylinder and was angled by another small 2-way cylinder.  The blade also had 2 springs that held it in the vertical position, but if something were hit, it would fold forward and ride over the obstacle.  (this happened 'occasionally')
 
Spent many hours building it, but it worked much better than I had hoped.  Sure moved a lot of snow with it.  Kids liked riding around sitting on my lap and going up and down small hills with it.
I no longer have the tractor...kinda wished I hadn't sold it.
 
Gatz
 
That's our oldest son Justin driving it.
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gatz in NE Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 11:07pm

Was curious as to how the tracked JD 140 steering was accompished.....anyone know?

Also, for those wanting to build a 4-wheel drive articulated tractor, you might look into using what's called a TORSEN differential.  The name is a shortening of "TORque SENsing"
This type of differential has a big advantage over conventional positive-lock differentials;  in slippery conditions, the driving wheel (the one with traction) never spins faster than the carrier.
It is used in many cars, and I had found a chart showing the brands of cars that used it.
IIRC, some Audis use this type of mechanism in the front & rear differentials as welll as the "transfer case".  Certain other cars with full-time 4wd make use of it too.
It's hard to explain just how it works, but if you google it, you'll find a lot of info.
If I ever get around to making another 4-wheel tractor, I think this is what I'd use.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TuckerRisner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Feb 2014 at 4:48pm
Me And my dad plan to built an articulator like your. got any tips?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Steve in NJ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb 2014 at 7:00am
I think the 29' Model A Tractor is neat! Nice job done on that. Simple but cute! And being I'm a Model A guy, that tickles my fancy...
39'RC, 43'WC, 48'B, 49'IB, 49'G, 49'WF, 67'B-110, 75'716H, 620, & a Motorhead wife
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gatz in NE Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb 2014 at 8:27am
Originally posted by GBACBFan GBACBFan wrote:

Take a look at the last pic in the first set, the B&W pic with the home built tractor with the sickle mower. It looks like he has an anvil laying on the mower to weight it down!


noticed that too, GB
must be for keeping the traction wheel that runs the sickle loaded to the ground ...gotta use what ya got!

kinda neat for a home-made tractor, but looks a bit cramped for the driver




Edited by Gatz in NE - 12 Feb 2014 at 8:28am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Holtby Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb 2014 at 3:08pm
Big Bud
1958 Series I D17 & 1967 Series IV D17
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